“Human Dynamics in the Workplace” – Essays on Personal and Professional Synergy

A journey is a story, and everyone has one to tell…..Celestine McMullen Allen

Human dynamics in the workplace is experiencing unprecedented twists and turns.  The outcomes become part of issues that organizations are struggling with to correct.  These human dynamic “issues” prevail in such a way that they are morhping in bad hires, lower employee engagement scores, higher turnover, higher possibilities of litigation, and lower expectation of leadership.

As these posts are evolving, it is relevant to note that paths take a “voice” when there is true reflection and one acknowledges the true “understanding of self”.  We also have to consider that our immergence into the world of work is not about us individually, but all facets of “us” which are worthy of consideration and contemplation – in terms of the individual that we are and the organizations that we support.    We have to true to our selves and take personal ownership in understanding the organizational culture that we may face day-to-day.  The organization owes us this same consideration.  And once we are in a place of understanding, it is so much easier to truly give of ourselves to the organizations that we support.  I am a staunch believer that “we are all suited by nature for a certain type of work; and that when we find that place; hard work is not hard at all”. 

 So, to set the stage for this post, I would like to summarize the gist of the first post.    It established the premise that collectively, individually and organizationally; or the we must embrace the total person or the organization that we are.    The second post embraced the premise that once this concept is understood, we then have a responsibility to be that person or organizazation, personally and individually, and let that same person be whom they are in the professional realm.  The previous posts were about blending the “trinity” of our personal and professional selves.

Here is an excerpt from Essays on Personal and Professional Synergy – (Post 2)

……….Are we  personally aligned individually to the “skin” that we live in everyday?   This is where and how the guards come down, and sets the stage for the total integrative concept of these posts.  For it is not just about career endeavors, it is the total assimilation of self into our world of work, how we lead, how we are perceived, and the importance of how we support our team and how they support us.   Yes, there is parallel in these journeys that do have a direct correlation to our world of work and the quality of our career choices. 

Somewhere, within the myriad of human experiences of our world of work lies the concept of the human persona that is oftentimes, forgotten about.  I have had many conversations throughout my career as it relates to the individual in the workplace, organizational dynamics, employee engagement, leadership and/or lack of, career choices and paths, performance management issues, as well as how employees are evaluated in the workplace.    It is with a lot of personal chagrin, angst, and empathy, that there were a lot more negative conversations rather than positive ones as the “people emotion” that came out of these conversations.  I experienced more disdain in understanding that “the human side” of an individual is not acknowledged in all of these functional areas of an organization and how they are managed.   It is as if  employees are just pawns, human capital, and a digit on a spreadsheet.  Unfortunately, this position can start as an employee is first recruited into an organization.  These collective concepts are worthy of a book, and I will be addressing them in subsequent posts until my totally synthesized message is understood and apparent.

Poignant questions and concepts of consideration of personal and professional synergy and human synergy include:

  •  If we, individually, do not understand what our personal career aspirations and path should entail, how can we hold any organization accountable to our personal success?
  •  If the recruiting process is not effective, how can there be an assurance of a good fit for both the aspirations of the applicant and the needs of the client?
  •  Once employees joins an organization, what is needed in terms of a comprehensive orientation, the identification of employee development initiatives, on-going training, ensuring that the needs of the organization are met, and opportunities for growth for the employee?
  •  Once employees join an organization, are the systems and processes in place for an employee to be successful?
  •  Once an employee joins an organization, does the organization even consider employee needs beyond their “bottom line” needs?
  •  Once an employee joins an organization, what can they expect in terms of support for their personal and professional development?

These points of consideration are not all inclusive.  But these points establish boundaries and perspectives for what “the big picture” should at least, begin with.  With this series of questions, I do contend that a broader concept of “trinity” emerges. This trinity considers the individual, their needs, along with the needs of the organization and the necessity to focus on the human side of an employee; another level of synergy.  Organizations need to do a better job of embracing the human side of the individual even before they become an employee.  For after all, people are people before they become employees.

This is not all about my perspective, nor should it be.  I would like to hear your thoughts.  Comment on the post or send me an email to celestine@visionqwestsolutions.com.

Celestine McMullen Allen

Vision Qwest Solutions

www.visionqwestsolutions.com

celestine@visionqwestsolutions.com

Follow me on Twitter at:  @VisionQwest

Contact Vision Qwest Solutions to help you to identify human factor areas that impede the sucess and viability of your oganization and for your personally.  Contact me at www.visionqwestsolutions.com or via my email at celestine@visionqwestsolutions.com

 

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